Posts tagged as "“new music 2012″"
  • The Vacations

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    Ska punk. That’s right, it’s back. The Vacations descibe it as happy-go-luck indie, but come on guys, let’s call a spade a spade. Without wanting to sound fickle, I used to love this kind of music – it accompanied some of my best pubescent moments which now seem so distant, and so it is with difficulty that I embrace its re-emergence. But I do, because for some reason I can’t help bop my head to Schoolboy Tricks (mp3). So welcome back, old friend, it’s been too long. Now calm the hell down and let me have my afternoon nap.

  • Eliza Doolittle (ft. Kwes) – Don’t Call It Love

    Happy-go-lucky popstress Eliza Doolittle has had the Kwes treatment…and, oh boy, what a result. Known for his experimental sounds, Kwes is not a total stranger to the soulful track, what with the pumping love song Igoyh from the Meantime. EP released earlier this year. Don’t Call it Love combines his synth organ sounds and prominent bass lines with Eliza Doolittle’s smoky voice, making it an edgy pop song. There are so many subtle embellishments to this track that the sum of them all is something unbeatable. If you’re as keen as me to find out when they’ll be releasing it for download, follow our Facebook and I’ll be sure to update you.

  • Monday Music – 10 September 2012

    Monday Music’s the one weekly post wherein Some Of It Was True! drops its London-only rule

    Indian Wells – Wimbledon 1980
    It was only a matter of time before someone released an album entirely based around tennis. Totally inevitable. So here’s Wimbledon 1980, from the album Night Drops. About tennis. Grunts et al.

    Big Scary – Bad Friends (Collarbones remix)
    For a fun game of audio spot the difference, first of all listen to this. Right, now listen to the clip below. Have you spotted the differences? I’ll help you out. Aside from vocals IT’S ENTIRELY DIFFERENT. Gently pulsing electronica replaces anything acoustic. This is SO Collarbones, and a lateral from the last time we covered them.

    Brown Bread & Von Holt - Beep Beep Beep
    Bedroom electronica producers Rebecca Doerfer and Colin Cheyne, living on opposite sides of NYC, came up with this dirty little number. Bedrooms, dirty numbers… sexy.
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    Ellie Goulding vs. Active Child – Hanging On (DiJai Miko mash-up)

    What happens if you take one track, and mash it up with another track that happens to be a cover of that track? Potentially not a lot. Another opportunity for a game of spot the difference? Yes, but this one is a lot harder. You’re no doubt familiar with Ellie Goulding’s take on Active Child’s Hanging On (obviously because we covered it a couple of months ago), but what DiJai Miko has aired by mixing it with the original are those juicy vocal harmonies and some Soulwax-esque mash-up trips, while taking out that inapropro Tinie Tempah section. And it works. Probably not the most creative mash-up…

    Matthew Dear – Her Fantasy
    Mr Matthew has been in the humble village of London lately, and provided a mix for the 6 Mix (…on BBC 6 Music). It was a darker set than the below track would suggest his style to be, but he did play its poolside remix (which is suitably lounging). This track features on his recently-released album Beams.

  • Bad Autopsy

    Oh boy, this track takes me back…to the womb. Yes, that’s right, Bad Autopsy recreates the sound of Anno Optimus, with orchestra and drum machine hits, and soulful samples. Little is known of this East London producer, although we can confirm that he is no one-trick pony with a selection of different styles under his belt, including grime and breaks.

  • Bear Driver (Album)

    It has been said that Some of It Was True! covers an awful lot of guitar bands. In our defence, the guitar-based band scene is one of London’s most thriving, plus there’s still a lot of electronica/urban items for perusal on our humble site. On that note, here’s a lively guitar-based act, Bear Driver, with their new album, also called Bear Driver. We heart guitars.